Using captions and embeds in WordPress 3.4

Using captions and embeds in WordPress 3.4
PS The main dog’s name is Darcy. Follow his antics at Daily Darcy

I’m sure by now you are loving being part of the WordPress community. Well, it just got even better.

Amid an array of important tweaks in the new version of WordPress, version 3.4, are two things that caught my eye:

  • easier and attractive embedding of tweets
  • more control over captions

I’ll demonstrate both of these shortly.

It is worth noting though, that a lot of coding has been reworked to make sure your WordPress site loads faster than ever before AND many of those little coding scripts that run in the background to make magic happen have been updated to keep ahead of the curve.

Of course, if you are a Baker Marketing client, I will be shocked if you have not already updated to version 3.4 because the little nagging notice has been in your Dashboard area for more than a week and you HAVE been blogging at least weekly, right?

If you haven’t, I’m sure you have a good reason but stop what you’re doing and head on over to your website and update now. Of course, you can contact us and arrange for one of our WordPress people to apply the updates for you, but I think it’s best to save your $20 and pop in and do it yourself. Who knows, you might be inspired to blog while you’re in there 🙂

If you DON’T have a WordPress website yet, maybe it’s time to consider our $950+GST WordPress starter package?

But now, here are the updates you’ll be seeing me milk for all they’re worth over the next few months.

A tweet, a tweet, my blog stream for a tweet

Without doing anything overly special, you can now make a favourite tweet appear in your WordPress Pages or Posts and do so in style.

Why would you bother?

A nicely showcased tweet that carries your story along or emphasises a key point, can help break up the page and give your readers’ eyes something fresh to be attracted to when scanning your writing.

This is what they look like:

Nice. Yes?

And by the way, the link in the tweet is clickable, as are hashtags and usernames, not to mention the ability to follow @baker-Marketing right there in the top left, or join the Twitter conversation by clicking Reply.

All I did to make that appear, was get the direct web link to the tweet and copy it into this page, like so:

https:// twitter.com/ baker_marketing/ status/ 200036992870916096

(I have put spaces in the example above so that the tweet did not appear twice.

To find the direct link to a specific tweet, do the following:

  1. Go to twitter.com and find a tweet you like (one you wrote or one somebody else wrote)
  2. Click on the ‘expand’ link underneath it
  3. Click on the ‘details’ link underneath the expanded tweet.
  4. Now the tweet will be in its own window and you can copy the direct web address from your browser address bar.
  5. Come back to your WordPress Page or Post, click the Paste As Plain Text button on the editing menu, paste in your link and click Insert.
  6. Just make sure the tweet address is not blue or clickable AND make sure it is on its own line.
  7. When you Publish or Update your page, your tweet will look like the one above.

This little trick also works for links to unique pieces of content on some other, carefully selected sites, including:

  • YouTube (only public videos and playlists – “unlisted” and “private” videos will not embed)
  • Vimeo
  • DailyMotion
  • blip.tv
  • Flickr (both videos and images)
  • Viddler
  • Scribd
  • Photobucket
  • PollDaddy
  • FunnyOrDie.com
  • Twitter

So update to WordPress 3.4 and start enjoying.

Get fancy with your captions

If you have been working with me or reading this blog a while, you will know how important it is to add images to your blog posts and pages.

But now, instead of one line of caption text that just snakes around after itself, you can use some simple HTML coding to add bold, italics or line breaks in your captions, and even include text that links.

I love the control this gives you but I deeply love that fact that we can now attribute images to photographers and other sources very, very clearly now.

Here is WordPress’ sample image:

wordpress-iimage-caption-html

This image was taken from the WordPress 3.4 welcome screen.
Click to read more about WP Version 3.4
That’s all for this caption because three lines is one too many!

In that sample, you can see they have a two-line caption including a link to the photographer.

I have then wrapped their sample image with an over-the=top and garish caption, just to show you a few things.

To create my three-line caption, I entered the following in the Caption box:

<strong>This image was taken from the WordPress 3.4 welcome screen.</strong>

Click to read more about <a href=”http://codex.wordpress.org/Version_3.4″ target=”_blank”>WP Version 3.4</a>

<em>That’s all for this caption because three lines is one too many!</em>

In HTML land, <strong> makes writing bold, <em> emphasises writing by putting it into italics, and <a href=”URL”> makes any words that follow become a link to whatever URL or web address you placed in the code. Note, all of these need to be followed by the same code and a back slash so that no other text is emboldened, italicised or made into a link, ie, </strong>, </em> and </a> close the coding instruction.

Practice with some of those in a caption, next time you load an image and see if it helps or hinders your display of information.

Now, go and update WordPress please.

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